Ask for a RubyMine free license


(Augier) #1

I talkde a little bit with few people about which IDE to use for ruby.

It seems like several like to use SublimeText which is indeed a great IDE but can be hard to setup and use.

To me, JetBrains provides some of the top IDE in the market. I already use PyCharm et IntelliJ for personal use and I love it.

As a well-known ruby project community, I thought it could be a good idea to ask for a free license for RubyMine in order to make the developement easier for newcomer (like me).

What is your opinion ?


Note: This discussion was imported from Loomio. Click here to view the original discussion.


(Jason Robinson) #2

Sounds like we meet the requirements, so I’d say go for it! If you feel unsure if you want to do it, we could draft an application message here and a member of the GitHub organization for example could make the application (myself for example) - so then they can see the person is really affiliated with the project from GitHub.

Not sure how many licenses they give, but I guess then we just track given out licenses according to whatever rules they set.

But a great idea! More treats like this from companies the better :wink:


(David Thompson) #3

RubyMine is nonfree software and I don’t think that Diaspora should be endorsing it. Strongly opposed.


(Jason Robinson) #4

@davidthompson do you also oppose me writing diaspora* code with SublimeText, which is also non-free software?

diaspora* as a project has never aimed to only use free software. What the project produces is free software.


(Augier) #5

@davidthompson : we are not obliged to do anything. Those who want to continues developping under emacs or sublime, could continue doing it.

Furthurmore, if we had to only use FOSS to develop Diaspora*, it would be a problem.

Not sure every developper uses only a linux or BSD. Some might be under Windows, or Max with XCode.


(David Thompson) #6

Personally using nonfree software isn’t a problem, but it is a problem (in my opinion, of course) when a free software project publicly endorses nonfree software by reaching out to a company like JetBrains for gratis licenses. That is what I’m opposing here.


(Jason Robinson) #7

Sorry David I misunderstood.

So I guess we should set up a vote then before reaching out to JetBrains, to make sure everyone gets to give their opinion.


(David Thompson) #8

Sure, If I’m outvoted, the people have spoken. :slight_smile:


(Augier) #9

Proposal: Contact JetBrains to ask for RubyMine licenses

Should Diaspora* community contact officially JetBrains to ask for free licences of RubyMine for its developpers ?


Outcome: N/A

Votes:

  • Yes: 4
  • Abstain: 0
  • No: 1
  • Block: 0

Note: This proposal was imported from Loomio. Vote details, some comments and metadata were not imported. Click here to view the proposal with all details on Loomio.


(Jason Robinson) #10

So, shall we draft an application here or someone want to just do it? :slight_smile:


(Augier) #11

I think it’s better to do it here, since I have not the expertise to talk in the name of the D* community ^^


(Augier) #12

Well, there is no text to write to apply. It just must be done by someone reponsible for the project leading.
D* can apply here


(Jason Robinson) #13

Done. Will update here once they get back.


(Augier) #14

Thank you a lot !


(Augier) #15

I’ll improve the D* wiki article on the IDE setup once I have test RubyMine !


(Mario Daniel Ruiz Saavedra) #16

Ok people, i’m late, but i asked Dr. Richard Stallman about this, and i got this response:

=====================================================================
David Thompson asserted that it would be a “problem” if you “had to” use only freedom-respecting software to develop Diaspora. That question is a red herring. People don’t need the approval of the Diaspora project for what they use privately. If they want to surrender their freedom by privately running a nonfree program, you
could not stop them; normally you would not even know.

The real issue is not what people can use, it is what the Diaspora project endorses and does. To offer people licenses for a proprietary program is more than just an endorsement. It is direct participation in the distribution of that program.

What that says to people is, “Freedom is not important.” In the long run, it undermines the love of freedom that would motivate why people to contribute to Diaspora.

I implore the Diaspora project to cease participation in distribution of a nonfree program, and I suggest that those who find that program convenient join in developing a free replacement for it.


(Augier) #17

Too late, we had a vote. Moreover, we do not obliged anyone to use anything.

If there was a free IDE of quality and the simplicity of JetBrain’s, why not. But the most important thing isn’t that people strat contributing to Diaspora* more than strictly respecting Guru’s voice ?


(goob) #18

Could someone point out what is the relevance of Stallman’s view to Diaspora? Last time I checked he wasn’t involved in the project (and never has been).

Diaspora has never insisted that only Free Software can be used in anything involving Diaspora’s software. Indeed, since the first release, it has been possible to install and run Diaspora on Mac OS, which is completely non-free. Diaspora is about freedom in the lower-case (non-Stallman) sense: allowing people to do what they want to do in as many ways as possible. The Stallman sense is about restriction as much as it is about real freedom.

I don’t see how enabling people to use a particular product without having to pay for it is in any way endorsing that product. If as part of this agreement Diaspora has to, for example, place a notice on the project website that we are thankful to JetBrains for giving project developers free licences (or, worse, that Diaspora is ‘partnering’ with JetBrains to develop Diaspora’s software), that would be something like endorsement, and that would, I think, need a separate discussion and vote.


(Jason Robinson) #19

RMS doesn’t even use diaspora* :stuck_out_tongue: I think we will listen to our own community - and we voted. We can always later vote again to not give licenses - anyone can create proposals at any time.

Diaspora is about freedom in the lower-case (non-Stallman) sense: allowing people to do what they want to do in as many ways as possible. The Stallman sense is about restriction as much as it is about real freedom.

Well put :slight_smile: This really is going off-topic but the more I hang around with “Stallmanists” the more they appear to me as people who want to restrict freedom, not allow it.

IMHO, in the wiki page we should also recommend other FOSS editors as well, not just RubyMine. Also, we don’t even know yet if they will accept our application.


(Augier) #20

IMHO, in the wiki page we should also recommend other FOSS editors as well, not just RubyMine. Also, we don’t even know yet if they will accept our application.

Of course, the goal of a IDE page is to let newcommer start easily with a well configured IDE !
I’m not particularly a RubyMine fan, just, I think that having a good IDE, beautifull with a strong completion system is a great help for beginners.

My exeprience is, when I started to learn several languages (e.g : OcamL), especially, web-oriented languages, the most difficult thing I met is to find tools to help me to start.

Having a tool with a performant completion system is very important when you start. The thing is, most IDE are too much generalistic. They do a lot of things, but they do it wrong unless you performed long and exhausting configurations…